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cosmology

This tag is associated with 87 posts

Dust gets interesting

Thought dust could only bore you? Think again: it may obscure our view of time’s very beginning!

The Boundaries of the Supercluster

Our local “basin of attraction” is the region containing all the galaxies that would contract to a single point, if we were to neglect the dominant expansion. The authors define this region as our home supercluster, Laniakea.

Void cosmology

The distribution of matter in the Universe has much to say about its constituents and evolution. Can the distribution of voids also help us understand the Universe?

How does structure grow? Understanding the Meszaros effect

Explore an astrophysical classic describing the effect of the Universe’s expansion on the seeds of galaxies.

Growth of structure tells us how normal and dark matter scatter

What can the growth of structure in the Universe tell us about how regular matter and dark matter scatter? The authors develop a simple framework and get model-independent constraints; read on for the answer.

Piecing together the Hubble constant

Different methods of measuring the Hubble constant yield slightly different values, but they are still in reasonable agreement.

A new method for cosmic distances: using active galactic nuclei

Time delays in the light from AGNs’ dusty torii can tell us the intrinsic luminosity and hence the distance to the AGN.

Astrophysical Classics: Cosmochronology with White Dwarfs

In today’s Astrophysical Classic, we hark back to 1987 and the introduction of a new method determining the age of the universe through the use of white dwarf stars.

Something from Nothing: Simulating our Universe

High resolution computational simulations are a valuable means by which Astronomers test our understanding of the Universe, and make predictions. The world of computational astrophysics broke new ground recently with the highest resolution cosmological simulation to date, Illustris, making for some spectacular science and some spectacular images.

Filling the redshift gap with carbon monoxide mapping

Can we find galaxies using the light emitted by their star forming regions? The authors of this paper explore a technique that would allow us to reach relatively unexplored epochs of the Universe.

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