archives

exoplanets

This tag is associated with 184 posts

More Bang for your Buck: Getting the Most out of Your Transit Light Curves

The Kepler Mission has measured planet radii and orbital periods for 3,000+ light curves. So what is next? Either we convince the continental USA to become amateur astronomers… Or we figure out ways to retrieve more planetary parameters from the Kepler data set. I’ll stick with the later. And so will the authors or this paper.

Habitability Whether Rocks Weather or Not?

Habitable zone estimations take the climate regulation of the carbon cycle into account. But are we drawing the edges of the habitable zone too wide?

ESPRESSO: A scientific Pandora’s box

Are you on the lookout to see if there are habitable planets are out there? Or do you want to see how or if physical ‘constants’ have varied with time? Why not design a versatile instrument capable at tackling a wealth of outstanding questions in astronomy: a sort of a “scientific pandora’s box” for extremely high precision astronomical research? This is where ESPRESSO comes in…

Could we detect signs of life on a massive super-Earth?

We have one canonical idea of what life looks like on Earth: nitrogen, water, carbon dioxide. But would this be true on another world? When looking for life in the atmospheres of exoplanets, we might want to consider searching for something completely different.

Exploring the Planetary Graveyard

Over the past decade the study of planetary debris at white dwarfs has become an increasingly exciting area. Observations of this debris have allowed us to make unique discoveries about the chemical composition of extrasolar rocky planets, as well as revealing the endpoints of the evolution of planetary systems very similar to our own…

Habitability Still a Go on Tidally Locked Terrestrial Exoplanets

Yang et al. use climate models to investigate whether rocky exoplanets around M-stars can retain their oceans in the face of tidal locking.

Habitable Moons at the Ice Line?

Those of us who love astrobiology get really worked up about the lack of Earth-sized exoplanets found at Earth-like distances from their stars. All we want, we who hope for lots of extraterrestrial life, is a bunch of Earth-like planets doing Earth-like things so we can feel better about the odds for lots of Earth-like life in the universe.

Tuning in to Radio Exoplanets

Title: Limits on low frequency radio emission from southern exoplanets Authors: Tara Murphy, et al. First Author Institution: Sydney Institute for Astronomy, The University of Sydney, Australia Status: Accepted for publication in MNRAS Astrobites is no stranger to exotic exoplanet discoveries- the Kepler mission alone has increased our knowledge of these worlds by leaps and bounds, and many exciting discoveries have been done […]

The Singles’ Club

Many exoplanets in our galaxy are all alone. They have no one to cuddle up to on those cold, lonely nights in space…

Planet Formation on a Budget

There does not seem to be enough mass in protoplanetary disks to build the planetary systems we’ve detected. The solution: planet formation might start sooner than previously thought.

Want an Astrobites t-shirt?

Enter the Astrobites reader survey to help us focus our content and style to serve you best. You could win a free Astrobites t-shirt!

Follow us on Twitter

Like us on Facebook

Astroplots

    http://astrobites.tumblr.com/post/65549158012http://astrobites.tumblr.com/post/62345439779http://astrobites.tumblr.com/post/60939853775http://astrobites.tumblr.com/post/59050954779Visit Astroplots to explore astronomy research through data representation.

Archives

Enter your email address to subscribe to Astrobites and receive notifications of new posts by email.